Writing a Good Fitness Sales Letter

Writing a good fitness sales letter will be a necessity at some point in your personal training career. It shouldn’t be anything to fret over, because it’s pretty much a fact of life. This is especially so when it comes to increasing name recognition in a prospective client base.

Keep in mind, though, that any fitness sales letter shares many similarities to most sales letters in any other business. For starters, the letter is about promoting the services which you feel will be valuable to a customer. You’re a personal trainer after all, and your services are going to be delivered personally to others. You won’t be an unknown super-conglomerate to any of your new customers, will you?

The first thing to emphasize when writing a good fitness sales letter is to focus on the potential customer. Leave out, for the most part, how great you personally are. Veteran marketing writers call this the “90/10 rule.” The sales letter talks about the customer 90 percent of the time and you — at most — 10 percent of it.

Make sure the letter addresses your possible clientele’s own fitness issues and how you can help these people address them. The time to talk about yourself is after you’ve begun training them. Up until then, keep the letter focused on them. After all, they don’t really know or actually care about you, for the most part. They will care deeply about themselves, though, so turn that to your benefit.

This next one can’t be reiterated enough: Always make sure to offer your potential clients something valuable. What might this be? Well, the list can be long. Perhaps a secret fitness program that only you have access to. Pro marketers believe a report of from four to eight pages is usually sufficiently valuable. And if you don’t know how to write, find somebody who does. It’s relatively inexpensive to commission a letter like this, nowadays.

Keep in mind that the best sales letters all leave out a distracting letterhead format at the top of the letter. It’s a curious fact that many people prefer to have a fancy-looking header at the top, but this just serves to take the reader’s attention away from the more important sales headline. There are times when a letterhead is called for, but this isn’t one of them, to be honest.

Any sales letter has a single goal in mind: To generate a response from the reader. Confusing the reader with a potentially-distracting bunch of non-applicable writing at the top will weaken, not strengthen the sales pitch. If you want it in the letter, site it down near your signature line, after you’ve made the pitch. Try not to use it at all, though.


Source by Joe McLee